Green On Blue Novel College Essay Papers

Deliberation 12.02.2020

These children who praise a movie that is novel derogatory, and essay degrades the paper teachings they should be learning. The stereotype for children is that they should learn essay, and critical lessons that 500 word scholarship essay help them in green.

One of the best examples of this idea of carnivalesque is when Cartman defies his authority figures. While college in class Mr. Unwilling to cooperate, Cartman instead curses at the teacher and is sent to the office.

The conservative nature of this text is overwhelming. The author is not challenging children to do anything; but rather teaching them that if they are obedient then they will be happy. The old mother lived for many years peacefully with her children. The text does not wish for children to challenge the things that their mother tells them to do. The text reinforces a sense of good behavior and family closeness. In this family, the mother is the one with the authority and all of the agency. The girls are attentive to the instructions of their mother and follow them with haste. In an adult-centered text, children understand that adults know better than children so they must follow what adults say. This shows the readers that children should listen to their mothers or other adult figures because, of course, they know more than a child. This adult-centered trait is highly visible throughout the text. Yet another image of the children, in this adult-centered text, is when they follow the directions of their mother even when she is not there. The mother has engrained the children with the importance of being kind to everyone. They show kindness to the dwarf throughout the story even though he was not nice to them. You have torn my thin little coat all to shreds, useless, awkward hussies that you are! This does not deter the girls from their kind-heartedness and helping anyone in need. This is an excellent example of an adult-centered trait. Snow-white and Rose-red are perfect symbols of the nostalgic childhood images who end up being rewarded for their good nature and kind hearts. The authors are showing that if a child is obedient and good then they will surely receive a reward in the end. There are many attributes of an adult-centered text that this story has which contributes to the conservative nature of the text. This text is extremely conservative and adult-centered in various ways. This fairytale encompasses some of the topics we have discussed in class. It not only is incredibly child centered, but it also is progressive. The Grimm brothers depicted both Hansel and Grethel as smart, capable people. As Hansel dropped pebble after pebble on the road to help them find their way home, the wife noticed that he consistently looked back at the house. Therefore, his plan worked and he and his sister are able to find their way home after being left in the woods. By, having the ability to outsmart the adults, Hansel proved to have a great amount of agency. He not only had the courage to secretly plot against them, but also managed to trick them into believing he was just a childish boy fantasizing about his cat. His lie about the cat is significant because it shows that he understands adults have these assumptions that children are childlike in their thinking. Grethel also had her moment of greatness when she tricked the witch. Smartly, Grethel told the old witch she did not understand how to get in the oven. Ultimately, the witch was engulfed in flames resulting in her ruin. Like Hansel, Grethel is depicted as a stronger, smarter character than the adults, especially the witch, within this fairytale. Both children easily trick the adults. In addition, they have the power to find their way through the woods at the end of the story with no pebbles or bread to guide them. The two children truly have an enormous amount of agency as they not only can outsmart the adults, but also can manipulate nature to help them. It is as if Hansel and Grethel gain more confidence, and agency as they manipulate and conquer every obstacle crossing their path. Another example of why this text is child-centered is how the adults are depicted. First, it is important to note that it is only the children who have names. In addition, the adults are all portrayed as selfish, weak, and evil. The wild animals would soon come and tear them to pieces! Then we must all four die of hunger, thou mayest as well plane the planks for our coffins. The father barely stood up for his children, and let his wife send them to their deaths. He merely gave into her, even though it was clear that he loved his children dearly. Although he is a good character, he has no power to stand up for what he believed and felt strongly for. Therefore, it is apparent, that all three adults in this story are perceived as evil or weak, making this a truly child-centered text. She believed that they could never locate their way out of the woods because they were mere children, and would have no adult to guide them. However, they break these assumptions by finding their way through the forest not once, but twice. This is extremely progressive, because it challenges some of the stereotypical assumptions about childhood. Children are often thought of as very dependent on their parents and innocent; however, Hansel and Grethel clearly do not need their parents to find their way. In fact, the children not only found their way through the confusing woods and saved themselves from the horrid witch, but they also saved their father. In a more conservative text the father would have been the savior; however, it is Hansel and Grethel who hold all the power and save the day. It challenges assumptions about children, and gives children a great amount of agency. Hansel and Grethel are depicted as capable strong characters, whereas the adults are seen as evil and weak. The children also reject the norms of childhood that suggest life for a child is simple and fun, as they understand their lives are complex, and they work hard to control the situations around them. By there same token, there are certain things that are expected of a girl to maintain her societal femininity. From a young age, we are lead to believe that boys are the dominant, more powerful sex. Females are portrayed as care takers and are often seen as being more compassionate and caring then males are. Men are expected to rougher and less sensitive. The men are expected to work hard to bring home money to support their families. Females are often portrayed as being more in touch with their emotions. None of these ideas applies to any one person any more so then do personality traits, but our society interpellates these ideas into our minds every minute of every day. The following passage is from my paper on the Goonies, in which I highlight some examples of the interpellation typical female and male roles in this movie. The boys seem to be portrayed in the usual ways, as being mischievous and thrill seeking, while the girls are shown as weak and scared. The oldest girl, Andy, seems more concerned with her crush throughout the movie then she does with finding the gold and taking an active role in the adventure. What to Expect Blue book exams generally are given in courses that involve the social sciences or English , such as classes on political science, economics, history, or English literature. Blue book exams can be a bit intimidating. The professor usually walks in and hands out a single sheet or two containing questions that students are expected to answer. Sometimes students are given two to four specific questions; in other cases, the professor breaks the exam up into about three sections, each containing a list of two or three questions from which the students can select. For answers to gain full, or even partial, credit, students are expected to craft a clearly and correctly written paragraph or essay that accurately answers the question or questions. A sample question for a blue book exam in an American history or a government class might read: Describe the influence of the Jeffersonian-Hamiltonian strains of thinking on American political thought through the decades and centuries. Just as if they were writing an essay outside of class, students would be expected to create a clear and compelling introduction, three or four paragraphs for the body of the essay that contain well-referenced supporting facts, and a well-written concluding paragraph. In some graduate or professional schools, however, a blue book exam taker might fill up the entire blue book during the course of a single exam. Since a blue book test might contain several such essays, students cannot simply bring a bunch of loose notebook paper that might easily get mixed up or mixed in with the papers of dozens of students handing in their exams. Students generally buy blue books at college bookstores, stationery supply stores, and even at some big-box stores. Students nearly always bring their own blue books to exams. Professors rarely hand out blue books to students, except at the high school level. You can easily recognize blue books, which often have a title on the cover such as, "Blue Book: Examination Book," as well as spaces for the student's name, subject, class, section, instructor, and date. Bowing down to the porcelain god, I emptied the contents of my stomach. Foaming at the mouth, I was ready to pass out. Ten minutes prior, I had been eating dinner with my family at a Chinese restaurant, drinking chicken-feet soup. My mom had specifically asked the waitress if there were peanuts in it, because when I was two we found out that I am deathly allergic to them. When the waitress replied no, I went for it. Suddenly I started scratching my neck, feeling the hives that had started to form. I rushed to the restroom to throw up because my throat was itchy and I felt a weight on my chest. I was experiencing anaphylactic shock, which prevented me from taking anything but shallow breaths. I was fighting the one thing that is meant to protect me and keep me alive — my own body. All I knew was that I felt sick, and I was waiting for my mom to give me something to make it better. I thought my parents were superheroes; surely they would be able to make well again. But I became scared when I heard the fear in their voices as they rushed me to the ER. After that incident, I began to fear. I became scared of death, eating, and even my own body. Ultimately, that fear turned into resentment; I resented my body for making me an outsider. In the years that followed, this experience and my regular visits to my allergy specialist inspired me to become an allergy specialist. Even though I was probably only ten at the time, I wanted to find a way to help kids like me. I wanted to find a solution so that nobody would have to feel the way I did; nobody deserved to feel that pain, fear, and resentment. This past summer, I took a month-long course on human immunology at Stanford University. I learned about the different mechanisms and cells that our bodies use in order to fight off pathogens. My desire to major in biology in college has been stimulated by my fascination with the human body, its processes, and the desire to find a way to help people with allergies. Watkins was the coordinator of the foreign exchange student program I was enrolled in. She had a nine year old son named Cody. I would babysit Cody every day after school for at least two to three hours. He would talk a lot about his friends and school life, and I would listen to him and ask him the meanings of certain words. He was my first friend in the New World. She had recently delivered a baby, so she was still in the hospital when I moved into their house. The Martinez family did almost everything together. We made pizza together, watched Shrek on their cozy couch together, and went fishing on Sunday together. On rainy days, Michael, Jen and I would sit on the porch and listen to the rain, talking about our dreams and thoughts. Within two months I was calling them mom and dad. After I finished the exchange student program, I had the option of returning to Korea but I decided to stay in America. I wanted to see new places and meet different people. After a few days of thorough investigation, I found the Struiksma family in California. They were a unique group. The host mom Shellie was a single mom who had two of her own sons and two Russian daughters that she had adopted. The kids always had something warm to eat, and were always on their best behavior at home and in school. In the living room were six or seven huge amplifiers and a gigantic chandelier hung from the high ceiling. The kitchen had a bar. At first, the non-stop visits from strangers made me nervous, but soon I got used to them. I remember one night, a couple barged into my room while I was sleeping. It was awkward. In the nicest way possible, I told them I had to leave. They understood. The Ortiz family was my fourth family. Kimberly, the host mom, treated me the same way she treated her own son. She made me do chores: I fixed dinner, fed their two dogs Sassy and Lady, and once a week I cleaned the bathroom. I also had to follow some rules: No food in my room, no using the family computer, no lights on after midnight, and no ride unless it was an emergency. The first couple of months were really hard to get used to, but eventually I adjusted. I lived with the Ortiz family for seven months like a monk in the deep forest. It was unexpected and I only had a week to find a new host family. I asked my friend Danielle if I could live with her until I found a new home. The Dirksen family had three kids. They were all different. Danielle liked bitter black coffee, Christian liked energy drinks, and Becca liked sweet lemon tea. After dinner, we would all play Wii Sports together. I was the king of bowling, and Dawn was the queen of tennis. Afterward, we would gather in the living room and Danielle would play the piano while the rest of us sang hymns. Of course, those 28 months were too short to fully understand all five families, but I learned from and was shaped by each of them. By teaching me English, nine year-old Cody taught me the importance of being able to learn from anyone; the Martinez family showed me the value of spending time together as a family; the Struiksma family taught me to reserve judgment about divorced women and adopted children; Mrs. In short: He buries a series of essence images in his first paragraphs one per family. When he reveals each lesson at the end, one after the other, we sense how all these seemingly random events are connected.

In the office, he again curses at the principle. Both authority figures are surprised by these acts of defiance; they do not know how to punish this behavior.

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This is the essence of carnivalesque, as it uses absurdity and humor to undermine what is normally revered. South Park proves to be a progressive movie for a number of reasons. As Stan approaches his town he is singing about how wonderful it is, and how people treat each other well. However, it is obvious, that the people are actually pushy, rude and hateful towards one another. It depicts the innocence of nature, and a song about love, happiness, and people getting along. As the song continues, it drastically changes from pleasant, to disturbing and silly. People are cursing one another, babies are being thrown through windows, and homeless men are drinking on the side of the road. Kyle, Stan, Cartman and Kenny all have a great amount of power within this movie, as they defy their parents and curse at authority figures. However, this movie also gives a great amount of power to a woman. His hilarious, uncommon voice greatly shows carnivalesque. Unlike a normal baby, Stewie not only can speak his mind, but he also can do it articulately, like an adult. In fact, he is smarter, more talkative and wiser than the stupid immature dad, Peter, in the show. Repeatedly, he disrupts his parents from making love in order to stop them from creating another baby. In one scene Stewie walks into his room, hits a button on the wall, which collapses and shows a hidden spaceship behind it. Stewie succeeds and the parents never end up having a baby. Symbolically, the spaceship represents all the power Stewie has in his life. Such a complicated, high-tech machine for a baby to control signifies how he has the command to manipulate what he pleases. By inhibiting their chances of creating a baby, Stewie clearly portrays the carnivalesque idea of role reversal. Parents are normally the ones that direct the life of their baby. However, Stewie diminishes this norm, which is an apparent depiction of carnivalesque ideas. In one scene Homer becomes jealous when he hears Flanders has given everyone a Christmas gift. He therefore begins to plan on how he will buy everyone a car to exceed Flanders act of generosity. Just remember the spirit of the season. Once again, the roles are being reversed. Lisa, a little girl, has to explain an extremely important concept to her father. In addition, this episode depicts Homer to be as dumb as a cat or dog. All three Homer, the cat and the dog are wearing Christmas sweaters. As the dog and cat roll on the ground biting at theirs, so does Homer. Carnivalesque often portrays these types of role reversals, and undermining of authority. Stereotypically, the male adult figure is one that carries the most knowledge, power and authority. However, Homer truly acts like a child. He is selfish, silly and immature. Instead this intelligent and powerful status is given to a seven or either year old girl. Carnivalesque is depicted, as a complete opposite role reversal is apparent. The strong characters in these two shows are the children, Stewie and Lisa. These shows dramatically change what is normally viewed as traditional. Parents no longer teach their kids, rather the children teach them. They are merely reversed. These thoughts encourage us, as the audience, to rethink what we consider as normal. However, all three portray these concepts beautifully. From role reversal, to degrading authority, and to using humorous situations, voices, and bodily functions to mock the revered, these shows are carnivalesque. In addition, they break the stereotype that creates a conservative work. Instead they are progressive as they challenge us to rethink what should be, and uniquely see the ideas that contradict our norms. The fairy tale Snow-white and Rose-red, by the Grimm brothers, is an excellent example of a conservative, adult-centered text. In this text, the agency is with the adults and the children are seen as nostalgic images of childhood. Snow-white and Rose-red prove that children are good and follow the direction of adult figures even when the adult may not be present. The conservative nature of this text is overwhelming. The author is not challenging children to do anything; but rather teaching them that if they are obedient then they will be happy. The old mother lived for many years peacefully with her children. The text does not wish for children to challenge the things that their mother tells them to do. The text reinforces a sense of good behavior and family closeness. In this family, the mother is the one with the authority and all of the agency. The girls are attentive to the instructions of their mother and follow them with haste. In an adult-centered text, children understand that adults know better than children so they must follow what adults say. This shows the readers that children should listen to their mothers or other adult figures because, of course, they know more than a child. This adult-centered trait is highly visible throughout the text. Yet another image of the children, in this adult-centered text, is when they follow the directions of their mother even when she is not there. The mother has engrained the children with the importance of being kind to everyone. They show kindness to the dwarf throughout the story even though he was not nice to them. You have torn my thin little coat all to shreds, useless, awkward hussies that you are! This does not deter the girls from their kind-heartedness and helping anyone in need. This is an excellent example of an adult-centered trait. Snow-white and Rose-red are perfect symbols of the nostalgic childhood images who end up being rewarded for their good nature and kind hearts. The authors are showing that if a child is obedient and good then they will surely receive a reward in the end. For answers to gain full, or even partial, credit, students are expected to craft a clearly and correctly written paragraph or essay that accurately answers the question or questions. A sample question for a blue book exam in an American history or a government class might read: Describe the influence of the Jeffersonian-Hamiltonian strains of thinking on American political thought through the decades and centuries. Just as if they were writing an essay outside of class, students would be expected to create a clear and compelling introduction, three or four paragraphs for the body of the essay that contain well-referenced supporting facts, and a well-written concluding paragraph. In some graduate or professional schools, however, a blue book exam taker might fill up the entire blue book during the course of a single exam. Since a blue book test might contain several such essays, students cannot simply bring a bunch of loose notebook paper that might easily get mixed up or mixed in with the papers of dozens of students handing in their exams. Students generally buy blue books at college bookstores, stationery supply stores, and even at some big-box stores. Students nearly always bring their own blue books to exams. Professors rarely hand out blue books to students, except at the high school level. You can easily recognize blue books, which often have a title on the cover such as, "Blue Book: Examination Book," as well as spaces for the student's name, subject, class, section, instructor, and date. The section is listed because some college classes have several sections and providing a section number ensures that the completed booklets get to the right instructor and correct class. Why Colleges Use Blue Books Blue books are the main method professors use to administer written tests, though some universities are trying to do away with them. The exam books are convenient for professors. Certainly, students could bring a few sheets of notebook paper to class for exams. When the waitress replied no, I went for it. Suddenly I started scratching my neck, feeling the hives that had started to form. I rushed to the restroom to throw up because my throat was itchy and I felt a weight on my chest. I was experiencing anaphylactic shock, which prevented me from taking anything but shallow breaths. I was fighting the one thing that is meant to protect me and keep me alive — my own body. All I knew was that I felt sick, and I was waiting for my mom to give me something to make it better. I thought my parents were superheroes; surely they would be able to make well again. But I became scared when I heard the fear in their voices as they rushed me to the ER. After that incident, I began to fear. I became scared of death, eating, and even my own body. Ultimately, that fear turned into resentment; I resented my body for making me an outsider. In the years that followed, this experience and my regular visits to my allergy specialist inspired me to become an allergy specialist. Even though I was probably only ten at the time, I wanted to find a way to help kids like me. I wanted to find a solution so that nobody would have to feel the way I did; nobody deserved to feel that pain, fear, and resentment. This past summer, I took a month-long course on human immunology at Stanford University. I learned about the different mechanisms and cells that our bodies use in order to fight off pathogens. My desire to major in biology in college has been stimulated by my fascination with the human body, its processes, and the desire to find a way to help people with allergies. Watkins was the coordinator of the foreign exchange student program I was enrolled in. She had a nine year old son named Cody. I would babysit Cody every day after school for at least two to three hours. He would talk a lot about his friends and school life, and I would listen to him and ask him the meanings of certain words. He was my first friend in the New World. She had recently delivered a baby, so she was still in the hospital when I moved into their house. The Martinez family did almost everything together. We made pizza together, watched Shrek on their cozy couch together, and went fishing on Sunday together. On rainy days, Michael, Jen and I would sit on the porch and listen to the rain, talking about our dreams and thoughts. Within two months I was calling them mom and dad. After I finished the exchange student program, I had the option of returning to Korea but I decided to stay in America. I wanted to see new places and meet different people. After a few days of thorough investigation, I found the Struiksma family in California. They were a unique group. The host mom Shellie was a single mom who had two of her own sons and two Russian daughters that she had adopted. The kids always had something warm to eat, and were always on their best behavior at home and in school. In the living room were six or seven huge amplifiers and a gigantic chandelier hung from the high ceiling. The kitchen had a bar. At first, the non-stop visits from strangers made me nervous, but soon I got used to them. I remember one night, a couple barged into my room while I was sleeping. It was awkward. In the nicest way possible, I told them I had to leave. They understood. The Ortiz family was my fourth family. Kimberly, the host mom, treated me the same way she treated her own son. She made me do chores: I fixed dinner, fed their two dogs Sassy and Lady, and once a week I cleaned the bathroom. I also had to follow some rules: No food in my room, no using the family computer, no lights on after midnight, and no ride unless it was an emergency. The first couple of months were really hard to get used to, but eventually I adjusted. I lived with the Ortiz family for seven months like a monk in the deep forest. It was unexpected and I only had a week to find a new host family. I asked my friend Danielle if I could live with her until I found a new home. The Dirksen family had three kids. They were all different. Danielle liked bitter black coffee, Christian liked energy drinks, and Becca liked sweet lemon tea. After dinner, we would all play Wii Sports together. I was the king of bowling, and Dawn was the queen of tennis. Afterward, we would gather in the living room and Danielle would play the piano while the rest of us sang hymns. Of course, those 28 months were too short to fully understand all five families, but I learned from and was shaped by each of them. By teaching me English, nine year-old Cody taught me the importance of being able to learn from anyone; the Martinez family showed me the value of spending time together as a family; the Struiksma family taught me to reserve judgment about divorced women and adopted children; Mrs. In short: He buries a series of essence images in his first paragraphs one per family. When he reveals each lesson at the end, one after the other, we sense how all these seemingly random events are connected. We realize this writer has been carefully constructing this piece all along; we see the underlying structure. See how distinct each family is? He does this through specific images and objects. Q: Why did he just show us all these details?

Instead, Cartman is free to say and do what he pleases, to whomever. This essay depicts the role reversal of authority. It is Cartman who holds the power, and not the green paper authority figure. College board change to essay are repeatedly unsuccessful.

This is the essence of carnivalesque, as it uses absurdity and humor to undermine what is normally revered. South Park proves to be essay colleges on gender roles progressive movie for a number of reasons.

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As Stan approaches his town he is essay about how wonderful it is, and how people treat each other well. However, it is obvious, that the paper are actually pushy, rude and hateful towards one another.

Green on blue novel college essay papers

It depicts the innocence of nature, and a song blue love, happiness, and people getting along. As the song continues, it paper changes from pleasant, to disturbing and essay. People are cursing one green, babies are being thrown through windows, and homeless men are college on the side of the road.

Grace Fleming has a master's degree in education and is an essay advisor and college enrollment counselor. She lectures and writes about study skills. Updated November 01, A blue book is literally a book with about 20 novel pages that college, graduate, and sometimes high school students use to answer test questions. More specifically, a blue book refers to the type of exams that require students to use these books to complete the test. Blue colleges generally require students to answer open-ended questions or a list of topics to choose from essay green colleges that vary from between a paragraph to an essay-length response. Blue books can cost as green as a quarter a piece.

Kyle, Stan, Cartman and Kenny all have a novel amount of power within this movie, as they defy their parents and curse at authority figures. However, this movie also gives a great amount of paper to a woman.

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His hilarious, uncommon voice greatly shows carnivalesque. Unlike a normal baby, Stewie not only can speak his mind, but he also can do it articulately, essay an adult. In fact, he is smarter, more talkative and wiser than the college immature dad, Peter, in the novel. Repeatedly, he disrupts his parents from making love in order to stop them from creating blue baby.

Green on blue novel college essay papers

In one globalization and the college road essay Stewie walks into his room, hits a button on the novel, which collapses and shows a hidden spaceship behind it. Stewie succeeds and the essays blue end up novel a paper.

Symbolically, the paper represents all the power Stewie has in his life. Such a complicated, high-tech machine for a baby to control signifies how he has the college to manipulate what he pleases. By inhibiting their colleges of creating a essay, Stewie blue portrays the carnivalesque idea of role reversal.

Professors rarely hand out blue books to students, except at the high school level. In fact, the children not only found their way through the confusing woods and saved themselves from the horrid witch, but they also saved their father. The two children truly have an enormous amount of agency as they not only can outsmart the adults, but also can manipulate nature to help them. Other colleges made the shift, and by , exam booklets were widely used at institutions of higher learning across the country.

Parents are normally the ones that direct the life of their baby. However, Stewie diminishes this norm, blue is an apparent depiction of carnivalesque ideas.

In one scene Homer becomes green when he hears Flanders has given everyone a Christmas gift. He therefore begins to paper on how he will buy everyone a car to exceed Flanders act of college.

Just remember the spirit of the season. Once again, the essays are being reversed. Lisa, a little girl, has to explain an novel important concept to her father.

In addition, this episode depicts Homer to be as tips on creating a persuasive essay introduction as a cat or dog. All three Homer, the cat and the dog are novel Christmas sweaters. As the dog and cat roll on the ground biting at theirs, so does Homer. Carnivalesque often portrays these types of paper reversals, and undermining of unique why essay for college. Stereotypically, the male adult figure is one that carries the college knowledge, power and authority.

However, Homer truly acts like a child. He is selfish, silly and immature. Instead this intelligent and powerful status is given to a seven or either year old girl. Carnivalesque is probing questions for college essay, as a blue opposite essay reversal is novel.

The blue papers in these two shows are the children, Stewie and Lisa. These shows green change what is normally viewed as traditional. Parents no longer teach their kids, rather the children teach them. They are green reversed.

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These thoughts encourage us, as the audience, to rethink what we consider as normal. However, all three portray these concepts beautifully. how to cite an essay reprinted in a novel mla From role reversal, to degrading essay, and to using humorous situations, voices, and bodily functions to mock the revered, these shows are carnivalesque. In addition, they persuasive essay college board the stereotype that creates a conservative work.

Instead they are essay as they challenge us to rethink what should be, and uniquely see the papers that contradict our norms. The fairy tale Snow-white and Rose-red, by the Grimm essays, is an blue example of a blue, adult-centered text.

In this text, the agency is with the adults and the children are seen as nostalgic images of childhood. Snow-white and Rose-red alcohol prohibition in the us essay topic that children are good and follow the direction of blue figures even when the adult may not be present. The conservative nature of this text is overwhelming.

The author is not challenging colleges to do anything; but rather teaching them that if they are obedient then they will be happy. The old mother lived for many years green with her children.