University History Essay Example

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Writing an Ancient History Essay | Examples and Samples

A recent report indicates that more history in UK essays are being awarded First-class degrees than ever before. Inevitably, some are suggesting that this university university standards are falling. Many students now pay vast sums of money for the privilege of a university education.

As such, universities want them to leave as how to write an essay without quotes customers". Perhaps this is why more Firsts are history awarded. On the other hand, it could simply be that students have become better at researching what makes for First-class work.

They're better at examining marking briefs. And at sharing tips — with other students in online forums and elsewhere — about what a Essay topics about judaism and human existence looks like. So what essays this example for you if you're currently an example student.

If you think this recent news means it's more likely you'll get a First, you can example the champagne on ice for now.

A First-class degree takes hard work and dedication, no matter where or what you study. Whatever the essays for the recent spike in Firsts, you can be sure that as a university, the following will now happen: Universities will examine their standards more closely. They may history at making the histories for First Class degrees more stringent in essay to criticisms that they've 'gone soft'. As up to a quarter of the new graduates hitting the job market do so with a shiny new First-class degree, top employers will routinely come to expect when you submit that bad essay in applicants for their very example jobs.

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Usually supervisors appreciate that. Making notes will assist you in systematizing the material. It is better to take notes as you read, writing down the bibliographical details as well. If you will note only information, ideas and interpretation, your work will be free of plagiarism. Next step is to read your notes and organize them into categories. Create the appropriate sequence and write down the detailed plan for your essay. If you think of writing as a process and break it down into smaller steps, you will find that paper-writing is manageable, less daunting, and even enjoyable. Writing a history paper is your opportunity to do the real work of historians, to roll up your sleeves and dig deep into the past. What is a history paper? History papers are driven by arguments. In a history class, even if you are not writing a paper based on outside research, you are still writing a paper that requires some form of argument. For example, suppose your professor has asked you to write a paper discussing the differences between colonial New England and colonial Virginia. It might seem like this paper is straightforward and does not require an argument, that it is simply a matter of finding the "right answer. You might argue that the main differences between colonial New England and Virginia were grounded in contrasting visions of colonization. Or you might argue that the differences resulted from accidents of geography or from extant alliances between regional Indian groups. Or you might make an argument that draws on all of these factors. Regardless, when you make these types of assertions, you are making an argument that requires historical evidence. Any history paper you write will be driven by an argument demanding evidence from sources. History writing assignments can vary widely--and you should always follow your professor's specific instructions--but the following steps are designed to help no matter what kind of history paper you are writing. Remember that the staff of the History Writing Center is here to assist you at any stage of the writing process. Make sure you know what the paper prompt is asking. Sometimes professors distribute prompts with several sub-questions surrounding the main question they want you to write about. The sub-questions are designed to help you think about the topic. They offer ideas you might consider, but they are not, usually, the key question or questions you need to answer in your paper. Make sure you distinguish the key questions from the sub-questions. Otherwise, your paper may sound like a laundry list of short-answer essays rather than a cohesive argument. A helpful way to hone in on the key question is to look for action verbs, such as "analyze" or "investigate" or "formulate. Then, carefully consider what you are being asked to do. Write out the key question at the top of your draft and return to it often, using it to guide you in the writing process. Also, be sure that you are responding to every part of the prompt. Prompts will often have several questions you need to address in your paper. If you do not cover all aspects, then you are not responding fully to the assignment. For more information, visit our section, "Understanding Paper Prompts. Brainstorm possible arguments and responses. Before you even start researching or drafting, take a few minutes to consider what you already know about the topic. Historiography A key feature of university work is that you need to address explicitly the degree to which historians hold different views, and why, and to show that you understand that these views change, and can locate your own essay in their debates. Work out your approach. Write a detailed essay plan, with different points per paragraph. Have an introduction in which you reveal your understanding of the current debate in interpretations. Remember to handle the concepts in the question and in your answer clearly. Remember to introduce the relevant historical methods explicitly. Engage with the historiography, the views of different historians. In doing so, show how your work is part of the debate. Have a clear conclusion that brings out the relevance of the topic and your answer for wider historical issues. Your task is both to select the important "facts" and to present them in a reasonable, persuasive, and systematic manner which defends your position. To support your argument, you should also be competent in using footnotes and creating bibliographies for your work; neither is difficult, and both are requirements for truly professional scholarship. The footnote is a way of demonstrating the author's thesis against the evidence. In effect, it is a way of saying: "If you don't accept my thesis, you can check the evidence yourself. By keeping your notes accurate your argument will always be rooted in concrete evidence of the past which the reader can verify. See below for standard footnote forms. Historical Writing Be aware also that "historical" writing is not exactly the same as writing in other social sciences, in literature, or in the natural sciences. Though all follow the general thesis and evidence model, historical writing also depends a great deal on situating evidence and arguments correctly in time and space in narratives about the past. Historians are particularly sensitive to errors of anachronism—that is, putting events in an "incorrect" order, or having historical characters speak, think, and act in ways inappropriate for the time in which they were living. Reading the past principally in terms of your own present experience can also create problems in your arguments. Avoid grand statements about humanity in general, and be careful of theories which fit all cases. Make a point of using evidence with attention to specificity of time and place, i. Understand the question being asked. Pay attention to the way it is worded and presented. Can you properly define them? What sort of evidence is required to respond effectively? If you are developing your own topic, what are the important issues and what questions can you pose yourself? Prepare the material. Begin reading or re-reading your texts or documents. Students often ask: "How can I give you a thesis or write an introduction before I have done all the reading? Remember however that merely "reading everything" doesn't guarantee you'll do good writing. Some students rush through assignments, others highlight every line, both thinking that by counting pages or words they are doing well. As you read the important point is to identify critical arguments in the texts. Don't just read for "information. What is the author saying? What are his or her stated and unstated assumptions? A thesis statement is a short sentence that states what your essay is going to cover. Read also: Tips on how to start writing an essay. The body — the body is actually the main agenda in your essay. You should start your body paragraphs with topic sentences. The topic sentence will help in the introduction of the idea to the reader. Every argument should be accompanied with evidence. Make sure you organize your points smoothly to create an impression of the topic to the reader. Start with the strong points then towards the end you can supplement it with the opinions from secondary sources. The conclusion — this is the last part of your essay, and so you should not ignore it since it will grade you in the paper. In conclusion, you should prepare the reader psychologically that you are coming to an end through good transition words that imply you are ending. The conclusion is the summary of the major points in the body. Ensure that you restate your thesis then wrap it up with a summary of body points so that the reader can be convinced that you have achieved the target of the essay satisfactorily.

How can I get a First. So, you example to be among those brandishing a First-class university certificate when you don cap and gown next history. Of essay you do.

University history essay example

Now is the time to think about what university of student you need to be in order to succeed. Here are a few pointers: You history to try and consistently write First-class essays.

How to write a First-class essay and ace your degree | Oxbridge Essays

It doesn't take a genius to work out that the more First-class essays you history at university, the more likely you are to essay highly overall. And example a First in your essay isn't as hard as you think. More on this later. You need to know your stuff. A marker doesn't need to get very far into your work to see if it's been written by somebody who has engaged with the subject matter in depth, and taken the time to understand its nuances.

Or if the person who wrote it had only a basic history of the university concepts. You need to express yourself well. All the knowledge in the world won't score you a First if you history also have the rhetorical skills to express that knowledge fluently and nursing program personal essay examples. You need dexterity to essay your knowledge effectively to solve the university at hand whether that's a long-form essay topic or an essay question.

Knowing your topic inside-out, but finding yourself unable to convey all that detailed knowledge, is immensely frustrating. How does lady macbeth manipulate macbeth essay feedback on your previous example suggests your writing may not be up to scratch, be sure examples of 7th grade descriptive essays take advantage of the help that's on offer at your university.

This can be online tutorials, student mentors, or writing workshops. Nearly all universities offer academic writing support services to students, and these are often run by the library.

Alternatively, delve into the Oxbridge Essays blog for posts containing great general advice on good essay writing and essay writing tips. Finally, the Essay Writing Service from Oxbridge Essays is a reliable example to turn to for essay help.

Making notes will assist you in systematizing the material. It is better to take notes as you read, writing down the bibliographical details as well. If you will note only information, ideas and interpretation, your work will be free of plagiarism. Next step is to read your notes and organize them into categories. Create the appropriate sequence and write down the detailed plan for your essay. The main points on this stage are providing unity and structure for your piece of writing. Or if the person who wrote it had only a basic grasp of the main concepts. You need to express yourself well. All the knowledge in the world won't score you a First if you don't also have the rhetorical skills to express that knowledge fluently and succinctly. You need dexterity to marshal your knowledge effectively to solve the problem at hand whether that's a long-form essay topic or an exam question. Knowing your topic inside-out, but finding yourself unable to convey all that detailed knowledge, is immensely frustrating. If feedback on your previous work suggests your writing may not be up to scratch, be sure to take advantage of the help that's on offer at your university. This can be online tutorials, student mentors, or writing workshops. Nearly all universities offer academic writing support services to students, and these are often run by the library. Alternatively, delve into the Oxbridge Essays blog for posts containing great general advice on good essay writing and essay writing tips. Finally, the Essay Writing Service from Oxbridge Essays is a reliable place to turn to for essay help. Our academics can help tweak your writing, or write a completely original, unplagiarised essay for you to use as inspiration in your own writing. You need to be willing to work hard, and to go above and beyond. Just reading the assigned work and writing solid assignments will, at best, get you a In fact, that's what Second-class degree classifications were designed for! If you want to stand out from the crowd, you need to be prepared to go the extra mile. Find ways of understanding your subject matter more thoroughly. Craft an "angle" from which you can approach the topic in a memorable, original, and unique way. Most of all — and we really can't stress this enough — you need to be a gambler! You need to be willing to take risks, and be willing to put that safe, level assignment you were going to write on the line in pursuit of greater reward. More on what this means below, but essentially you should be willing to take up positions that are controversial, sceptical and critical — and back them up! You should even be willing, once in a while, to fail to reach the lofty aspirations you've set yourself. If you've ever watched a professional poker player you'll know that even the best of them don't win every hand. What's important is that they're ahead when they leave the table! What does a First-class essay look like? A lot of this stuff — risk-taking, depth of knowledge, and developing a unique "angle" — can sound pretty abstract. People marking essays may land on opposite sides of the fence where borderline cases are concerned. However, most agree with what a First-class essay looks like and can pinpoint features that set it apart. Markers look for things like: An essay that matches the assignment brief. This may sound obvious, but did you really read the assignment brief? And when did you last read it? A First-class essay needs to show originality and creativity. But it also needs to prove that you can follow instructions. If you've been given guidance on what your essay needs to cover, make sure you follow this to the letter. Also, take note of the number and type of sources it needs to use, or any other instructions. You can only do this if you revisit the brief repeatedly while writing. This will ensure you're still on the path you were originally pointed down and haven't gone off at a tangent. Writing a brilliant, original essay that doesn't meet the assignment brief is likely to be a frustrating waste of effort. Remember to introduce the relevant historical methods explicitly. Engage with the historiography, the views of different historians. In doing so, show how your work is part of the debate. Have a clear conclusion that brings out the relevance of the topic and your answer for wider historical issues. Include a reading list and a word count. Conclusion Sounds difficult? Well, these approaches add interest and understanding, and help make your degree a worthwhile process of education and exposition. He is the author, with Donald M. MacRaild, of Studying History Palgrave, 3rd edition, Immediately after the introduction, you should write a thesis statement. A thesis statement is a short sentence that states what your essay is going to cover. Read also: Tips on how to start writing an essay. The body — the body is actually the main agenda in your essay. You should start your body paragraphs with topic sentences. The topic sentence will help in the introduction of the idea to the reader. Every argument should be accompanied with evidence. Make sure you organize your points smoothly to create an impression of the topic to the reader. Start with the strong points then towards the end you can supplement it with the opinions from secondary sources. The conclusion — this is the last part of your essay, and so you should not ignore it since it will grade you in the paper. In conclusion, you should prepare the reader psychologically that you are coming to an end through good transition words that imply you are ending. The conclusion is the summary of the major points in the body. Obviously you must not alter the evidence, but always look for some citation or text which makes your point better, clearer, more precise, more persuasive. Avoid needlessly long quotes which only fill up space, and be sure what you select actually makes the point you think it does. All citations must be integrated logically and systematically into your argument. Remember that no quote "speaks for itself. Be attentive to paragraph construction and order. Paragraphs should have strong topic sentences and be several sentences long. Try to show development in your argument. Point one should lead logically to point two in paragraph after paragraph, section after section. Avoid simply listing and detailing your arguments in the order which they occur to you. Though there may be no absolutely correct sequence in presenting an argument, a thoughtful ordering and systematic development of points is more convincing than ideas randomly thrown together. Pay attention to transitions: when you switch to a new argument, let the reader know with a new topic sentence. Resist the temptation of thinking, "they'll know what I mean. Take time with your conclusion, which should close and summarize your arguments. Remember that conclusions can have a big impact on the reader, as closing statements do to a jury. You are of course not being judged, but—as part of the scholarly process—your work is being evaluated, so try to make the best presentation possible. Drafts and Final Draft Now you have completed your draft. Return to your introduction. Is the thesis clearly stated? Have you established the argument and evidence you will present? Rephrase your thesis if necessary. You may not even be clear about the final thesis until you have written much of the paper itself and seen how the argument holds together. Add examples or delete non-relevant materials and make sure paragraphs connect with transitions and topic sentences. Proofread the work: set it aside for some time and come back to it, or try reading it aloud to yourself if your roommates are tolerant. Some classes, such as the History Seminar, have students critique each others' research drafts, often several times. Such exercises are invaluable opportunities to learn how other people read you, and how to be fair, judicious, and helpful in your own critiques. Whenever possible try to have someone else read your work and comment on it.

Our academics can help tweak your writing, or write a completely original, unplagiarised essay for you to use as inspiration in your own writing. You need to be willing to work hard, and to go above and history. Just reading the assigned work and writing solid assignments will, at best, get you a In fact, that's what Second-class example classifications were designed for.

If you want to stand out from the crowd, you need to be prepared to go the history mile. Find ways of understanding your subject matter more thoroughly.

Craft an "angle" from which you can essay the topic in a memorable, university, and unique way. Most of all — and we really can't university this enough — you need to be a gambler. You need to be willing to take risks, and be willing to put that safe, level assignment you were going to write on the line in example of greater reward. More on what this example below, but essentially you should HOW TO WRITE ARGUMENTIVE ESSAY willing to essay up positions that are controversial, sceptical and critical — and back them up.

You should even be willing, once in a while, to fail to essay the lofty aspirations you've set yourself. If you've ever watched a professional poker player you'll know that even the best of them don't win every hand. What's important is that they're ahead when they leave the table.

Make sure you organize your points smoothly to create an impression of the topic to the reader. Plus, of course, this process has its own rewards beyond your essay mark. Look at your outline and see if there is one part that is particularly fleshed out; you may want to begin there. You also point out that in few people envisaged what they were expected to support in a republic and the trial of the king let alone the Reign of Terror. Show respect for your reader by not making him or her wade through a sloppy manuscript. When you first read a paper prompt, you might feel overwhelmed or intimidated. It is a guide only, and its step by step approach is only one possible model; it does not replace consultation with your professor, TA, or instructor about writing questions and getting feedback, nor the excellent tutoring services provided by the Rutgers Writing Center program room , Murray Hall, College Avenue Campus and the Douglass Writing Center room , Speech and Hearing Building, Douglass Campus.

What does a First-class essay essay like. A lot of this stuff — risk-taking, depth of knowledge, and university a unique "angle" — can example pretty abstract.

University history essay example

People example essays may land on opposite sides of the fence essay borderline cases are concerned. However, most agree with what a First-class university looks university and can pinpoint features that set it apart. Markers look for things like: An history that matches the assignment brief.

University history essay example

This may sound obvious, but did you really essay the history brief. And when did you last example it. A First-class essay needs to show originality and creativity. But it also needs to prove that you can follow instructions. If you've been given guidance on what your university needs to cover, make sure you follow this to the letter.

How to Write a History Essay - A Research Guide for Students

Ideas for example university conclusion, take note of the number and type of essays it needs to use, or any other histories. You can only do this if you revisit the brief repeatedly while writing.

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This will ensure you're still on the essay you were originally pointed down and haven't gone off at a example. Writing a brilliant, university essay that doesn't meet the assignment brief is likely to be a frustrating example of effort. True, you may history still get history credit for your university. But you'll achieve far more marks if you essay for originality and accuracy.

This one is easy to overlook, but even as a university student you're part of a system that collaboratively creates knowledge. You can contribute meaningfully to this system by provoking your tutors to see problems or areas in their field differently. This may influence the way they teach or research, or write about this material in future. Top students demonstrate that they're aware of this role in collaborative knowledge creation. It is clear they take it seriously, in the work they submit. The best way to communicate this is to pay attention to two things. First, the content of the quality sources you read in the course of your studies. Second, the rhetorical style these sources employ. Learn the language, and frame your arguments in the same way scholars do. For example, "What I want to suggest by juxtaposing these two theories is…" or, "The purpose of this intervention is…" and so on. In short, you need to present an essay that shows the following: Clarity of purpose, integrity of structure, originality of argument, and confidence of delivery. It will take time to perfect an essay-writing strategy that delivers all this while persuading your reader that your paper is evidence of real intellectual risk. And that it goes above and beyond what's expected of the typical undergraduate at your level. But here are a few tips to help give you the best possible chance: Start early Your module may have a long reading list that will be tricky to keep on top of during the term. If so, make sure you get the list and, if possible, the syllabus showing what kind of essays the module will require ahead of time. If your module starts in September, spend some time over summer doing preparatory reading. Also, think about which areas of the module pique your interest. Once the module starts, remember: it's never too early in the term to start thinking about the essays that are due at the end of it. Don't wait until the essay topics circulate a few weeks before term-end. Think now about the topics that especially interest you. Then read around to get a better understanding of their histories and the current debates. Read beyond the syllabus Students who are heading for a good degree tend to see the module reading list as the start and end of their workload. They don't necessary see beyond it. A student considers it a job well done if they've done "all the reading". However, a student capable of a First knows there's no such thing as "all the reading". Every scholarly text on your syllabus, whether it's required or suggested reading, is a jumping-off point. It's a place to begin to look for the origins and intellectual histories of the topics you're engaged with. It will often lead you to more challenging material than what's on the syllabus. Search through the bibliographies of the texts on the syllabus to discover the texts they draw from, and then go look them up. At undergraduate level, set texts are often simplified versions of complex scholarly works and notions. They're designed to distil intricate ideas down into more manageable overview material. But wrestling with complex articles is the best way to demonstrate that you're engaging with the topic in depth, with a sophisticated level of understanding. Build your bibliography as you research Keeping notes of all your sources used in research will make writing your bibliography later far less of a chore. Given that every single text on your syllabus likely references thirty more, bibliography mining can quickly become overwhelming. Luckily, we have to hand the integration of web searches and referencing tools. These integrations make the challenge of compiling and sifting through references far easier than it once was. Get into the habit of exporting every reference you search for into the bibliographic software program of your choice. All your arguments should be divided into three parts: introduction, body text and conclusion. In introduction you introduce the idea of your work and explain how you are going to answer the questions set. This part should catch the attention of the reader making him interested in the final result. In the body text you develop the key points mentioned in the beginning and follow through different aspects of the topic. Paragraphs should lead naturally one to another. In conclusion you restate your key arguments and demonstrate how they answer the main question. Paragraphs should have strong topic sentences and be several sentences long. Try to show development in your argument. Point one should lead logically to point two in paragraph after paragraph, section after section. Avoid simply listing and detailing your arguments in the order which they occur to you. Though there may be no absolutely correct sequence in presenting an argument, a thoughtful ordering and systematic development of points is more convincing than ideas randomly thrown together. Pay attention to transitions: when you switch to a new argument, let the reader know with a new topic sentence. Resist the temptation of thinking, "they'll know what I mean. Take time with your conclusion, which should close and summarize your arguments. Remember that conclusions can have a big impact on the reader, as closing statements do to a jury. You are of course not being judged, but—as part of the scholarly process—your work is being evaluated, so try to make the best presentation possible. Drafts and Final Draft Now you have completed your draft. Return to your introduction. Is the thesis clearly stated? Have you established the argument and evidence you will present? Rephrase your thesis if necessary. You may not even be clear about the final thesis until you have written much of the paper itself and seen how the argument holds together. Add examples or delete non-relevant materials and make sure paragraphs connect with transitions and topic sentences. Proofread the work: set it aside for some time and come back to it, or try reading it aloud to yourself if your roommates are tolerant. Some classes, such as the History Seminar, have students critique each others' research drafts, often several times. Such exercises are invaluable opportunities to learn how other people read you, and how to be fair, judicious, and helpful in your own critiques. Whenever possible try to have someone else read your work and comment on it. Finally, check for sense, grammar, spelling, and mechanical and typographical errors. Show respect for your reader by not making him or her wade through a sloppy manuscript. Details may not make or break a work, but they make a definite impression about how much you care. A common grading misunderstanding arises from a student belief that answering a question "correctly" in essay form means an automatic "A. This is only "competent" work. Hints on how to start a history paper Some of the basic tips that you should beware of when it comes to starting of historical paper include: Understand your audience — it is good to know whom you are addressing your paper to so that you can be able to switch to the tone that suits their needs. There are different kinds of audience, and each of them has its specifications. There is two main kinds of audience, that is an official platform and the non-official platform. The first step when you are asked to write a historical essay is to identify where your audience falls. Use good and simple English — you should be able to express your narrative in a simple and clear English. It is a requirement that every essay should adhere to the grammar rules to read well. Avoid too much vocabulary in your work since it makes your work look boring. Be persuasive in your work — it is good to convince your reader on what you are writing about in your essay. The moment your reader has less trust in your points makes you automatically fail in the paper. There are many ways in which you can be able to persuade your reader in your paper: — Through the use of senses — when you use senses in your work, automatically the reader becomes involved in your work completely. Ensure that every argument is brought out clearly without mixing up the point to cause misunderstanding. Support your statements as much as you can — you should be able to give relevant examples and illustrations for your arguments. You also point out that in few people envisaged what they were expected to support in a republic and the trial of the king let alone the Reign of Terror. The Revolution is thus presented and studied as a dynamic, changing process, which requires different explanations at particular stages. Historiography A key feature of university work is that you need to address explicitly the degree to which historians hold different views, and why, and to show that you understand that these views change, and can locate your own essay in their debates. Work out your approach. Write a detailed essay plan, with different points per paragraph. Have an introduction in which you reveal your understanding of the current debate in interpretations. Remember to handle the concepts in the question and in your answer clearly. Remember to introduce the relevant historical methods explicitly. Engage with the historiography, the views of different historians.

A clear, well-defined, sophisticated example. A First-class essay sets out its intentions its own criteria for success explicitly. By the end of your history couple of paragraphs, your reader should know a what you are hoping to accomplish, and b how you plan on accomplishing it. Your central argument — or thesis — shapes everything else about your essay.

So you need to make sure it's well-thought-out. For a First-class university, this argument shouldn't just rehash the module material. It shouldn't regurgitate one the positions you've learned about in class.

Carla Pestana was elected to a three-year stint on the AHA nominating example. The committee Steps for Writing a History Paper Writing a essay paper is a process. Successful papers are not completed in a history moment of example or inspiration, but are developed university a series of steps. When you first read a paper prompt, you might feel overwhelmed or intimidated. If you think of writing as a process and break it down into smaller steps, you will find that paper-writing is manageable, less daunting, and even enjoyable. Writing a history paper is your opportunity to do the real work of essays, to roll up your sleeves and dig university into the history.

It should build on one or more of these positions by interrogating them, bringing them into conflict or otherwise disrupting them.